The Weekly Brief

Just a quick update in case you missed it.




Released on 07.06.2022






Follow the party and prosper: oppose it and die”


In the second part of this two-part essay, Bao Tong, a former political secretary to late, ousted Chinese leader Zhao Ziyang, comments on the Premier Li Peng's accounts of the events leading up to the June 4, 1989 bloodshed by the People's Liberation Army that put an end to weeks of student-led protests on Tiananmen Square.

Read more: rfa.org



Japan's first election candidate of Uyghur heritage backed by majority party


Arfiya Eri, 33, is running for a seat in the House of Councillors, the Japanese senate. She is world's first election candidate of Uyghur heritage backed by a major party. On May 30, Ms. Eri participated in a press conference to announce additional candidates for proportional representation officially held at the Liberal Democratic Party headquarters and made a greeting.

Read more: uyghurtimes.com



The forced labour filling our closets: U.S. Is coming after it in an unprecedented way


Here's an uncomfortable thought experiment for the next time you're standing before your wardrobe, running your fingertips through your garments. Count five items containing cotton. Stop at the fifth garment. Now imagine an enslaved human being. Because by this point, you're statistically likely to own their work.

Read more: cbc.ca



Religious Freedom Report Places Focus on China's Atrocities and Uyghur Genocide

Of all nations mentioned in the US Department of State’s annual report on global religious freedom, China commanded the most attention, foregrounding the Uyghur genocide as one of the most profound examples of religious rights violations today. Uyghurs have paid a steep price for their identity and for their religion as Muslims, and have been separated from loved ones,

Read more: campaignforuyghurs.org



UHRP will not let the world forget June 4th


The date marks a turning point in the nearly two-month-long 1989 Democracy Movement that took place throughout China to promote democratic reforms and civil rights. With the wave of democratization in Eastern Europe and beyond, the Chinese people have also shown their government and the international community that China was ready to join the free world through a series of peaceful demonstrations.


Read more: uhrp.org



Why did Deng feel the need to conspire in this way?”


In the first part of this two-part essay, Bao Tong, a former political secretary to late, ousted Chinese leader Zhao Ziyang, comments on the Premier Li Peng's accounts of the events leading up to the June 4, 1989 bloodshed by the People's Liberation Army that put an end to weeks of student-led protests on Tiananmen Square.


Read more: rfa.org



Lawyer Michael Vidler reflects on 19 years of equal rights advocacy in Hong Kong, and his reasons for leaving


The 58-year-old Brit cited concerns over the Beijing-drafted national security law and “unfounded allegations” by the city’s bellicose state-controlled press. As one of the go-to lawyers for equal rights cases since the early 2000s, he fought for minority groups – most notably the LGBT community – at a time when the topic itself was still taboo. He was also engaged by a number of high-profile pro-democracy activists.

Read more: hongkongfp.com